Sub-genre a.k.a Common Genre

Sub-genre (a.k.a Common genre) are different varieties of writing styles that can be categories under two main genre: Fiction and Non-fiction.

Common genres: fiction

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  • Classic – fiction that has become part of an accepted literary canon, widely taught in schoolsClassics396137_3249-2.jpg
  • Crime/detective – fiction about a crime, how the criminal gets caught, and the repercussions of the crime
  • Drama – stories composed in verse or prose, usually for theatrical performance, where conflicts and emotion are expressed through dialogue and action
  • Fable – narration demonstrating a useful truth, especially in which animals speak as humans; legendary, supernatural taleprompt-photo2.jpg
  • Fairy tale – story about fairies or other magical creatures
  • Fan fiction – fiction written by a fan of, and featuring characters from, a particular TV series, movie, or book
  • Fantasy – fiction with strange or otherworldly settings or characters; fiction which invites suspension of reality
  • Fiction in verse – full-length novels with plot, subplot(s), theme(s), major and minor characters, in which the narrative is presented in verse form (usually free verse)
  • Fiction narrative – literary works whose content is produced by the imagination and is not necessarily based on fact
  • Folklore – the songs, stories, myths, and proverbs of a people or “folk” as handed down by word of mouth
  • Historical fiction – story with fictional characters and events in a historical setting
  • Horror – fiction in which events evoke a feeling of dread and sometimes fear in both the characters and the reader
  • Humor – Usually a fiction full of fun, fancy, and excitement, meant to entertain and sometimes cause intended laughter; but can be contained in all genres
  • Legend – story, sometimes of a national or folk hero, that has a basis in fact but also includes imaginative material
  • Magical realism  – story where magical or unreal elements play a natural part in an otherwise realistic environment635890934224265787884431994_new-harry-potter-story-halloween.png
  • Meta fiction – also known as romantic irony in the context of Romantic works of literature, uses self-reference to draw attention to itself as a work of art, while exposing the “truth” of a story
  • Mystery – this is fiction dealing with the solution of a crime or the unraveling of secrets
  • Mythology – legend or traditional narrative, often based in part on historical events, that reveals human behavior and natural phenomena by its symbolism; often pertaining to the actions of the godsmaxresdefault.jpg
  • Mythopoeia – fiction in which characters from religious mythology, traditional myths, folklore and history are recast into a re-imagined realm created by the author
  • Picture book – picture storybook is a book with very little words and a lot of pictures, picture stories are usually for little kids
  • Realistic fiction – story that is true to life
  • Science fiction – story based on impact of actual, imagined, or potential science, usually set in the future or on other planets
  • Short story – fiction of such brevity that it supports no subplots
  • Suspense/thriller – fiction about harm about to befall a person or group and the attempts made to evade the harm
  • Tall tale – humorous story with blatant exaggerations, swaggering heroes who do the impossible with nonchalance

Common genres: nonfiction

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  • Biography/autobiography  – narrative of a person’s life; a true story about a real person
  • Essay  – a short literary composition that reflects the author’s outlook or point.
  • Journalism – reporting on news and current events
  • Lab Report  – a report of an experiment
  • Memoir  – factual story that focuses on a significant relationship between the writer and a person, place, or object; reads like a short novel
  • Narrative nonfiction/personal narrative  – factual information about a significant event presented in a format which tells a story
  • Reference book  – such as a dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, almanac, or atlas
  • Self-help book  – information with the intention of instructing readers on solving personal problems
  • Speech  – public address or discourse
  • Textbook  – authoritative and detailed factual description of a topic.
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